click map See Out Hear Out Feel Out See In Hear In Feel In Notice Rest Notice Flow

"The primary focus of this path of choosing wisely is learning to stay present. Pausing very briefly, frequently throughout the day, is an almost effortless way to do this. For just a few seconds we can be right here. Meditation is another way to train in learning to stay or learning to come back, to return to the present over and over again."
~ Pema Chödrön, from Taking the Leap  
Discoveries Topics
poetry (586) quotes (189) self (188) writing (187) writers (173) paying attention (169) music (168) art (155) self/other (131) mindfulness (121) uncertainty (120) videos (117) film (116) neuroscience (112) creativity (107) seeing (106) happiness (104) impermanence (104) feeling (99) nature (94) memory (93) poets (93) meditation (90) thoughts (90) love (89) time (89) equanimity (87) death (79) identity (78) TED (78) connection (77) perception (77) science (77) senses (74) life (72) practice (70) religion (69) yearning (67) childhood (64) metta (64) attention (63) suffering (61) hearing (60) language (60) mundane (57) present (57) technology (56) fiction (54) observations (54) learning (53) waking up (53) grief (52) photography (51) research (51) wonder (50) growing up (49) illusion (48) listening (48) loneliness (48) excerpt (45) concentration (44) aging (43) directors (43) complete experience (42) story (42) fear (41) imagination (41) compassion (40) silence (40) storytelling (40) family (37) musicians (37) artists (36) emptiness (36) truth (36) enlightenment (35) mystery (35) reading (35) Shinzen Young (35) dreams (34) education (34) beauty (33) society (33) community (32) culture (31) documentary (31) emotion (31) Buddhism (30) confusion (30) freedom (30) transformation (30) live performance (29) war (29) animation (28) humanity (28) mind (28) actors (27) change (27) communication (27) hope (27) parenting (27) flow (26) God (26) images (25) maturity (25) expansion/contraction (24) On Being (24) seasons (24) waiting (24) workplace (24) evolution (23) inspiration (23) narrative (23) reality (23) relationships (23) Zen (23) acting (22) David Whyte (22) feelings (22) history (22) contemplative (21) home (21) mythology (21) pain (21) persistence (21) sounds (21) vulnerability (21) winter (21) America (20) ego (20)

Entries in emotion (31)

Monday
Aug122013

A Battle of Arguments

 

Excerpt from "What Can You Learn about Persuasion from Hostage Negotiation?" a Barking Up the Wrong Tree interview with Chris Voss:

What are the most common mistakes people make when negotiating?

They neglect to pay attention to emotional factors, and they really neglect to listen.

I compare a lot of negotiations to dealing with a schizophrenic, because a schizophrenic’s always got a voice in his head talking to him which makes it very hard for him to listen to you.

Now most people in business negotiations, they approach the negotiation, and they’ve got firmly in their mind all of the arguments that support their position. So when they’re not talking, they’re thinking about their arguments, and when they are talking, they’re making their arguments. They view negotiation as a battle of arguments.

If while you’re making your argument, the only time the other side is silent is because they’re thinking about their own argument, they’ve got a voice in their head that’s talking to them. They’re not listening to you. When they’re making their argument to you, you’re thinking about your argument, that’s the voice in your head that’s talking to you. So it’s very much like dealing with a schizophrenic.

If your first objective in the negotiation, instead of making your argument, is to hear the other side out, that’s the only way you can quiet the voice in the other guy’s mind. But most people don’t do that. They don’t walk into a negotiation wanting to hear what the other side has to say. They walk into a negotiation wanting to make an argument. They don’t pay attention to emotions and they don’t listen.


See also:

Sunday
Aug112013

Deconstruct the Message Behind the Words

"A later response, and much more useful, would be to try and deconstruct the message behind the words, so when the voices warned me not to leave the house, then I would thank them for drawing my attention to how unsafe I felt -- because if I was aware of it, then I could do something positive about it -- but go on to reassure both them and myself that we were safe and didn't need to feel frightened anymore. I would set boundaries for the voices, and try to interact with them in a way that was assertive yet respectful, establishing a slow process of communication and collaboration in which we could learn to work together and support one another.

Throughout all of this, what I would ultimately realize was that each voice was closely related to aspects of myself, and that each of them carried overwhelming emotions that I'd never had an opportunity to process or resolve, memories of sexual trauma and abuse, of anger, shame, guilt, low self-worth. The voices took the place of this pain and gave words to it, and possibly one of the greatest revelations was when I realized that the most hostile and aggressive voices actually represented the parts of me that had been hurt most profoundly, and as such, it was these voices that needed to be shown the greatest compassion and care."

~ Eleanor Longden 


See also: 

Monday
Jul012013

They Feel Everything

Excerpt from "Learning to Live with My Son's Autism," by David Mitchell, The Guardian, June 28, 2013:

My wife and I translated The Reason I Jump clandestinely, just for our son's therapists, but when my publishers read the manuscript, they believed the book might find a much wider audience.

For me, Naoki Higashida dissolves the lazy stereotype that people with autism are androids who don't feel. On the contrary, they feel everything, intensely. What's missing is the ability to communicate what they feel.

Part of this is our fault – we're so busy being shocked, upset, irritated or looking the other way that we don't hear them. Shouldn't we learn how?

Read the entire essay...

[Thanks, Alex!]

Monday
Dec102012

An Internal World

Excerpt from "The Brain's Ability to Look Within: A Secret to Well-Being," by Emma M. Seppala, Feeling It: Psychology Today Blog, December 10, 2012:

Most of us prioritize externally oriented attention. When we think of attention, we often think of focusing on something outside of ourselves. We "pay attention" to work, the TV, our partner, traffic, or anything that engages our senses. However, a whole other world exists that most of us are far less aware of: an internal world, with its varied landscape of emotions, feelings, and sensations. Yet it is often the internal world that determines whether we are having a good day or not, whether we are happy or unhappy. That’s why we can feel angry despite beautiful surroundings or feel perfectly happy despite being stuck in traffics. For this reason perhaps, this newly discovered pathway of attention may hold the key to greater well-being.

Although this internal world of feelings and sensations dominates perception in babies, it becomes increasingly foreign and distant as we learn to prioritize the outside world.  Because we don’t pay as much attention to our internal world, it often takes us by surprise. We often only tune into our body when it rings an alarm bell –– that we’re extremely thirsty, hungry, exhausted or in pain. A flush of anger, a choked up feeling of sadness, or the warmth of love in our chest often appear to come out of the blue.

More...

Thursday
Oct252012

How Disgust Influences Our Moral Beliefs

"We have sort of a built-in poison detector. You can see this as early as even in newborn infants. If you are willing to do this, you can take a couple of drops of a bitter substance or a sour substance, and you'll see that face, the tongue stick out, the wrinkled nose, as if they're trying to get rid of what's in their mouth.This reaction expands into adulthood and becomes sort of a full-blown disgust response, no longer just about whether or not we're about to be poisoned, but whenever there's a threat of physical contamination from some source. But the face remains strikingly similar. It has expanded more, though, than just keeping us away from physical contaminants, and there's a growing body of evidence to suggest that, in fact, this emotion of disgust now influences our moral beliefs and even our deeply held political intuitions."

~David Pizarro, from "The Strange Politics of Disgust," TED Talks, May 2012