click map See Out Hear Out Feel Out See In Hear In Feel In Notice Rest Notice Flow

"The primary focus of this path of choosing wisely is learning to stay present. Pausing very briefly, frequently throughout the day, is an almost effortless way to do this. For just a few seconds we can be right here. Meditation is another way to train in learning to stay or learning to come back, to return to the present over and over again."
~ Pema Chödrön, from Taking the Leap  
Discoveries Topics
poetry (586) quotes (189) self (189) writing (187) writers (173) paying attention (169) music (168) art (155) self/other (131) mindfulness (121) uncertainty (120) videos (117) film (116) neuroscience (113) creativity (107) seeing (106) happiness (105) impermanence (104) feeling (99) nature (94) memory (93) poets (93) meditation (90) thoughts (90) love (89) time (89) equanimity (87) death (80) connection (78) identity (78) TED (78) perception (77) science (77) senses (74) life (72) practice (70) religion (69) yearning (68) childhood (64) metta (64) attention (63) suffering (61) hearing (60) language (60) mundane (57) present (57) technology (56) fiction (54) observations (54) waking up (54) grief (53) learning (53) photography (51) research (51) wonder (50) growing up (49) illusion (48) listening (48) loneliness (48) excerpt (45) concentration (44) story (44) aging (43) directors (43) complete experience (42) storytelling (42) fear (41) imagination (41) compassion (40) silence (40) family (37) musicians (37) truth (37) artists (36) emptiness (36) enlightenment (35) mystery (35) reading (35) Shinzen Young (35) dreams (34) education (34) society (34) beauty (33) community (32) transformation (32) culture (31) documentary (31) emotion (31) Buddhism (30) confusion (30) freedom (30) humanity (29) live performance (29) war (29) animation (28) change (28) mind (28) actors (27) communication (27) hope (27) parenting (27) flow (26) God (26) images (25) maturity (25) expansion/contraction (24) narrative (24) On Being (24) seasons (24) waiting (24) workplace (24) evolution (23) inspiration (23) reality (23) relationships (23) Zen (23) acting (22) David Whyte (22) feelings (22) history (22) contemplative (21) ego (21) home (21) mythology (21) pain (21) persistence (21) sounds (21) vulnerability (21) winter (21) America (20) empathy (20)

Entries in parenting (27)

Tuesday
Mar112014

Turning to Me

Ablution 
by Amy Fleury, from American Life in Poetry: Column 468

Because one must be naked to get clean,
my dad shrugs out of his pajama shirt,
steps from his boxers and into the tub
as I brace him, whose long illness
has made him shed modesty too.
Seated on the plastic bench, he holds
the soap like a caught fish in his lap,
waiting for me to test the water’s heat
on my wrist before turning the nozzle
toward his pale skin. He leans over
to be doused, then hands me the soap
so I might scrub his shoulders and neck,
suds sluicing from spine to buttock cleft.
Like a child he wants a washcloth
to cover his eyes while I lather
a palmful of pearlescent shampoo
into his craniotomy-scarred scalp
and then rinse clear whatever soft hair
is left. Our voices echo in the spray
and steam of this room where once,
long ago, he knelt at the tub’s edge
to pour cups of bathwater over my head.
He reminds me to wash behind his ears,
and when he judges himself to be clean,
I turn off the tap. He grips the safety bar,
steadies himself, and stands. Turning to me,
his body is dripping and frail and pink.
And although I am nearly forty,
he has this one last thing to teach me.
I hold open the towel to receive him.


See also: "Jane Gross — The Far Shore of Aging," On Being, July 2011

Thursday
Sep052013

Instincts

Where Will U Go Next?

Instincts
by Daron Larson

There is great comfort
in losing a child
to her own adult life,

naturally, 

and yet

a little girl is still gone

leaving me to tend
this yearning to nurture
a fragile beginning
toward its gradual

sudden blooming.

 

Monday
Jul012013

They Feel Everything

Excerpt from "Learning to Live with My Son's Autism," by David Mitchell, The Guardian, June 28, 2013:

My wife and I translated The Reason I Jump clandestinely, just for our son's therapists, but when my publishers read the manuscript, they believed the book might find a much wider audience.

For me, Naoki Higashida dissolves the lazy stereotype that people with autism are androids who don't feel. On the contrary, they feel everything, intensely. What's missing is the ability to communicate what they feel.

Part of this is our fault – we're so busy being shocked, upset, irritated or looking the other way that we don't hear them. Shouldn't we learn how?

Read the entire essay...

[Thanks, Alex!]

Saturday
Jun222013

Acceptance Takes Time

"Love is something that ideally is there unconditionally throughout the relationship between a parent and a child. But acceptance is something that takes time. It always takes time."

Andrew Solomon

See also: Solomon, A. (2012). Far from the tree: Parents, children and the search for identity. New York: Scribner. (library, Audible)

Monday
Sep032012

Unsung Courage

Nicolson’s Café was a first floor restaurant on the corner of Nicolson and Drummond Street famous for being the location where J.K. Rowling worked on Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.

Excerpt from The Three Marriages: Reimagining Work, Self, and Relationship by David Whyte:

There are two possibilities, perhaps we can call them necessities, for keeping the marriage with work alive through the difficult years of childbearing and child rearing. The first is to reimagine the way we have named our work and defined its success. We may find that our priorities have been erased and redrawn by a birth or an adoption; that we don't care for the corporate world's priorities anymore and that mothering or indeed fathering is now our central work.

We may come to the reimagination of our work through the gladly received, genuine revelations of parenting or especially for women, with difficulty, through a rueful acceptance that the months or years with a child have taken us off the career track and that the sacrifices needed to get back on that moving stair are not worth what it would take. Even if we find that circumstances allow us both to be a good parent and to follow a brilliant career, the moral basis of the brilliant career hinges on not neglecting or abandoning our children at crucial times in their growing, and demands that we reexamine the basis of our marriage with work and many of the outer rewards of prestige we demanded up to the moment we became parents. 

The second necessity is to find a rhythm, often with the help of our partner or our family or our friends that enables us to make short visits to that kingdom of silence and creativity. These short visits on a regular, rhythmical basis may not further the work very much in the early days, but they are essential to keeping it alive in the heart and mind of the struggling parent until time begins to open up as the child grows and goes off to school. As this window begins to widen and allow fresh air into the life of the besieged parent, the work also slowly begins to resuscitate itself and come back to life. Our vocation starts to pick its feet out of the mud and move onto higher, drier ground. 

J.K. Rowling famously wrote large portions of the first Harry Potter book in the midst of this caked, slow-moving, mud-walking, desperate parent stage. "There was a point where I really felt I had 'penniless divorcée, lone parent' tattooed on my head," she said in one interview (Seaton, 2001). Living alone with her infant daughter, Jessica, in an unheated Edinburgh flat, she would trudge through the streets wheeling Jessica to a local café and snatch moments at her writing between feeding and comforting her child. It's a help to know that Rowling felt a general hopelessness during much of that time, and a further encouragement to know that she kept on moving through the mud, kept on writing despite her quiet, private despair. 

The café in Edinburgh where J.K. Rowling wrote now has a small plaque on the wall outside to explain who sat there with such private, unsung courage. Most likely the place in which we sit and struggle to bring our work back to life will have nothing to commemorate it except a little window in our own memory that opens onto the small stage on which we appeared during difficult times. 

Perhaps each of us should go back with actual plaques and place them in cafés, on walls or in office cubicles with little notes of private courage for the inspiration of others. "This is where I kept my faith alive during very dark days," "This is where I found the courage to leave my marriage," or "This is where I realized that I couldn't have everything I wanted and so felt the freedom to request what I needed." Such puzzling, intriguing and inspirational signs everywhere might bring us to an understanding of the constant enacted dramas occurring around us. How every chair and every corner holds a possibility for redemption. The plaques that said things such as "This is the table where I gave up on my ideals and took the very large bribe" would be equally instructive for the reader.